Posts in category

Japanese food culture


I returned! It is Jenna ryu, former Life and Travel intern, now promoted to Life and Wellness fellow. You may remember my last takeover of “This is America”, where I broached the myth of the Asian “model minority” and shared my experience with these micro-aggressions. (If not, see here.) But today I’m here to talk …

Australian lamb, especially branded lamb, is increasingly a part of Japanese culinary culture and its popularity is its affordability compared to other meats. And while lamb consumption in Japan remains skewed towards the northern island of Hokkaido, consumers in less traditional areas like Tokyo and Osaka are interested in retail lamb for home consumption. More …

A feast for the senses awaits visitors at Japan’s largest summer festival, held in conjunction with the 10th annual Sports Hub Community Play Day, at the National Stadium on September 8-9. The stadium premises will be transformed into a massive festival ground with over 100 Japanese food, game and merchandise stalls, as well as a …

At Ayame’s Japanese market, owner Akemi Eguchi examined the contents of one of the freezers – the one hidden behind imported DVDs and rice cookers. She identifies kidney bean candy, melon bread (“Famous with American anime kids,” she notes), pickled vegetables and daikon radish. Spread around the store, a few more coolers are filled with …

TOKYO – While pork and beef prices remain high in Japan, lamb is gaining popularity as a cheaper, healthier alternative. When The Nikkei was hanging out by a supermarket crate of meat, we spotted a housewife in her 40s who was there to buy steak for dinner. She ended up with lamb steaks. “I chose …

Editor’s Note – Joshua Paul Dale is a professor at Gakugei University in Tokyo. He is co-editor of “The Aesthetics and Affects of Cuteness”, and editor of “Cute Studies”, a special issue of the East Asian Journal of Popular Culture. (CNN) – The menu at Pom Pom Purin Café in Tokyo is the epitome of …

Tokyo: Chefs from many countries took part in the latest Washoku competition to popularize traditional Japanese cuisine around the world and the winner of the previous event, Jaran Deephuak from Thailand was invited as the presenter of the prize to the winner. “Washoku is continuously developing and progressing. Its technique and taste have become higher. …

If only one theme emerges in the documentary “Wa-shoku: Beyond Sushi”, it is the importance of presentation in Japanese cuisine. Director Junichi Suzuki may have taken a tip or two from the chefs and experts he interviewed. Jumping among subjects, places, and talking heads, his film begins to resemble a tray filled with an all-you-can-eat …